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Global Cities 2010

Foreign Policy Magazine aims to measure how much sway a city has over what happens beyond its own borders -- its influence on and integration with global markets, culture, and innovation. See the list of cities with a global reach in 2010.

Published August 23, 2010 in News      10 Comments    Open printer friendly version of this article Print Article



New York City was ranked as the #1 Global City in 2010.


So what makes a Global City? Not size alone, that's for sure; many of the world's largest megalopolises, such as Karachi (60), Lagos (59), and Kolkata (63), barely make the list. To create this year's rankings, we analyzed 65 cities with more than 1 million people across every region of the globe, using definitive sources to tally everything from a city's business activity, human capital, and information exchange to its cultural experience and political engagement. Data ranged from how many Fortune Global 500 company headquarters were in a city to the size of its capital markets and the flow of goods through its airports and ports, as well as factors such as the number of embassies, think tanks, political organizations, and museums. Taken together, a city's performance on this slate of indicators tells us how worldly -- or provincial -- it really is.

http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2010/08/11/the_global_cities_index_2010

RankCityRank by Pop.Rank by GDP
1New York 62
2London 285
3Tokyo11
4Paris206
5Hong Kong3114
6Chicago254
7Los Angeles123
8Singapore3823
9Sydney4324
10Seoul2219
11Brussels5448
12San Francisco4616
13Washington 4210
14Toronto3620
15Beijing1333
16Berlin4846
17Madrid3422
18Vienna5540
19Boston4111
20Frankfurt6420
20Shanghai721
22Buenos Aires1112
23Stockholm5952
24Zurich6158
25Moscow1913
26Barcleona3731
27Dubai5649
28Rome4937
29Amsterdam6360
30Mexico City58
31Montreal4435
32Geneva6561
33Miami5854
33Munich3518
35Sao Paulo39
36Bangkok3242
37Copenhagen6059
38Houston4017
39Taipei5326
40Atlanta3915
41Istanbul2130
42Milan5239
43Cairo1736
44Dublin6255
45New Delhi232
46Mumbai425
47Osaka167
48Kuala Lumpur5765
49Rio de Janeiro1427
50Tel Aviv5040
51Manila1534
52Johannesburg4543
53Jakarta2447
54Bogota2945
55Caracas5162
56Nairobi4764
57Guangzhou2738
58Bangalore3053
59Lagos1863
60Karachi1050
61Ho Chi Minh City3356
62Shenzhen2628
63Kolkata844
64Dhaka950
65Chongqing 2357


http://www.foreignpolicy.com/node/373401







10 Comments

cityimrov

August 23, 2010, 05:02:43 AM
What number would Jacksonville rank at?

hightowerlover

August 23, 2010, 07:10:27 AM
N/A

JeffreyS

August 23, 2010, 10:22:56 AM
I might have added media (news, TV, movies and such) as a factor if it is about how a city affects those beyound it's borders. Atlanta, N.Y.C. and L.A. controll a lot of what comes into peoples homes.

stjr

August 23, 2010, 04:06:42 PM
What number would Jacksonville rank at?

LOL.  Maybe would make the top 25 in the Southeastern U.S.  :D

We just had a thread on our lack of identity.  We have a long way to go on being a city that influences the rest of the nation, much less the rest of the world.


Quote
Foreign Policy Magazine aims to measure how much sway a city has over what happens beyond its own borders -- its influence on and integration with global markets, culture, and innovation. See the list of cities with a global reach in 2010.

Based on the above criteria, we may have some small level of "integration with global markets" but our influence on culture is barely perceptible (I'm being generous) and our reputation for innovation is flat lined in areas that count, such as culture, education, transportation, technology, etc. compared with other cities.  Yes, we have some individual standouts, but not a community of standouts.  This exercise is evaluating the community.

cityimrov

August 23, 2010, 05:08:39 PM
It's funny in a way when I think about it.  Jacksonville should have been a global city but due to it's infighting and complacency it lost to other cities in the region.  The invention of air-condition didn't help either.

If I remember my history correctly, in the early 1900, Jacksonville was the top city in the region, ranked higher than Miami!  Funny, Jacksonville - better than Miami!  Unfortunately, the bickering and complacency of the citizenry at that time was rather bad causing a whole string of problems which is pretty well documented.  

Does this city have a chance to become a global city?  Can it grow beyond it's past and insecurities to make it to the list of global cities?  Will it's citizens fight to become one of the best of the best?  

In reality, there's nothing stopping it from being that - nothing except it's own citizens.  It's up to it's own citizens to decide what future it want it to become.

gatorback

August 23, 2010, 05:27:02 PM
I think if Houston fixed the roads and sidewalks, we'd go up in the ranking. Our roads are a mess.

Coolyfett

August 23, 2010, 06:01:15 PM
I winsted when I saw Atlanta on the list, they dont belong there. That picture of New York looks like a picture from a Wheres Waldo book....so much going on in that photo. A lot going on. Couldnt help but wonder what Northbank would look like if that many people were roaming around. New York has it going on.

stjr

August 23, 2010, 11:40:31 PM
That picture of New York looks like a picture from a Wheres Waldo book....so much going on in that photo. A lot going on. Couldnt help but wonder what Northbank would look like if that many people were roaming around. New York has it going on.

That's Times Square at a relatively LESS busy time.  Was up there a not too long ago, and it was much more crowded.  At night, it's just about standing room only .  By the way, more police in Times Square than people in all of Downtown Jax!  NYPD can also be found on almost every street corner in NY, nowadays, day and night.  They sure know how to make people feel comfortable walking the streets of NY.  We could learn more than a few lessons from the masters of the #1 world class city.

Jason

August 24, 2010, 08:48:56 AM
Quote
If I remember my history correctly, in the early 1900, Jacksonville was the top city in the region, ranked higher than Miami!  Funny, Jacksonville - better than Miami!  Unfortunately, the bickering and complacency of the citizenry at that time was rather bad causing a whole string of problems which is pretty well documented.


Jacksonville was a higher teir city than Miami until the 40s where although Miami/south Fla was tops in population, Jax still had the clout and pizzaz.  Shortly after the last streetcars were canned, highways started popping up and the "White Flight" movement hit full swing Jax quickly fell to Miami and eventually Tampa and Orlando in the 70s and 80s.

stephendare

August 24, 2010, 08:50:05 AM
That and the reign of Ed Ball and the Porkchop gang created real reasons why people would decide NOT to come to Jacksonville as well.
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