Friday, August 1, 2014
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
 

Learning from Hoboken, NJ

With the fourth highest population density in the nation, The Mile Square City offers an interesting look at making the most out of a limited land situation.

Published August 13, 2008 in Learning From      7 Comments    Open printer friendly version of this article Print Article


feature

 STATISTICS

Hoboken, NJ Population 2006: 39,853 (City) - (incorporated in 1849)

Jacksonville Pop. 2006: 794,555 (City); 1,300,823 (Metro) - (incorporated in 1832)

City population 1910: Jacksonville (57,699); Hoboken, NJ (70,324)


1910 Hoboken Population Density 70,324 residents per square mile
2006 Hoboken Population Density 30,239 residents per square mile


HOBOKEN FIRSTS

  • First brewery in the United States, north of Castle Point
  • The zipper, invented at Hoboken's Automatic Hook & Eye Co.
  • The site of the first known baseball game between two different teams, at Elysian Fields
  • The first steam-powered ferry, in 1811, with service to Manhattan
  • First demonstration of a steam locomotive in the United States at 56 Newark Street.
  • The first departure of an electrified commuter train, in 1931, driven by Thomas A. Edison from Lackawanna Terminal to Dover, New Jersey.
  • The home of the accidental invention of soft ice-cream, 726 Washington Street.
  • The nation's first automated parking garage at 916 Garden Street.
  • The first Blimpie restaurant, opened in 1964 at the corner of Seventh and Washington Streets. A free goldfish in a colored bowl of water was given to all customers who purchased a sandwich during the opening week.
  • The first centrally air-conditioned public space in the United States, at Hoboken Terminal.
  • The first wireless phone system, at Hoboken Terminal.
  • The Oreo cookie, first sold in Hoboken

 

 

ABOUT HOBOKEN

Originally an early 1800's waterfront resort for Manhattanites, Hoboken quickly developed into a compact port, railroad terminal, and manufacturing center by the end of the century. 

During the 1960s, the city fell on hard times as its housing stock aged and the industrial engines of its economy left for greener sprawling pastures.  During the 1980s, the city began the process of reinventing itself by attracting many of New York's "bohemian types".

Today, the city makes the most of its 1.3 square miles of land area with a recreational waterfront, restored brownstones and new infill multi-family development.

 





 















 

 




 



 




 





 


 

BONUS: JERSEY CITY

New Jersey's second largest city is located just south of Hoboken.  Out of all Jersey City commuters, 8.17% walk to work, and 40.26% take public transit. This is the second highest percentage of public transit riders of any city with a population of 100,000+ in the United States, behind only New York City and ahead of Washington, D.C.

STATISTICS

Jersey City, NJ Population 2006: 241,791 (City) - (incorporated in 1820)

Jacksonville Pop. 2006: 794,555 (City); 1,300,823 (Metro) - (incorporated in 1832)

City population 1930: Jacksonville (129,549); Hoboken, NJ (316,715)

 


 



 



 

LEARNING FROM HOBOKEN & JERSEY CITY

Combined, these cities contain 281,644 residents, covering 16.2 square miles.  Despite having a combined population density of 17,385 residents per mile, low rise multi-family developments make up most of their building mass.  These cities offer Jacksonville a glimpse into how urban districts can achieve high population density, without losing the close knit feel and atmosphere of a residential district.  This will become an important issue locally, as residential districts surrounding downtown continue to fill in with new growth and development.

Article written by Ennis Davis








7 Comments

Abhishek

August 13, 2008, 08:27:22 AM
But they dont have any where to spread to. Jersey City and Hoboken are locked in a small space. They dont have the adjoining Clay and St. Johns county to grow into. Jacksonville does. So, why spend more money and build taller buildings and closer knit areas when every family can have their own front and back yard. I have seen want of privacy and the dream to have your own house+yard propell people towards suburbia than urban environments. I am all up for living in denser areas but what can the city do to get a family out from their single family home on 210/Intl. Golf Parkway with better schools and country-side-simulated-living to a denser urban housing? Yes, one day the suburbia will be short on land and gas prices will make it harder for people to commute that far, but by then the environmental and infrastructural damage will have been done. We need to act now to promote denser urban districts.

thelakelander

August 13, 2008, 09:34:32 AM
But they dont have any where to spread to. Jersey City and Hoboken are locked in a small space. They dont have the adjoining Clay and St. Johns county to grow into. Jacksonville does. So, why spend more money and build taller buildings and closer knit areas when every family can have their own front and back yard.

They don't have Clay and St. Johns County but they do have the entire state of New Jersey to sprawl across, which the metro does.  Anyway, that's pretty irrelevent.  The point of the story is to show an example of a high density neighborhood that's pedestrian friendly, but still maintains its neighborhood feel.  Also, I'm one of those that don't desire a large front and backyard.   I had one in Central Florida and hated having to maintain it (or pay for someone to maintain it).  While I may be an exception to the rule, I'm sure there are more out there like me.  This is why its good to have alternatives.

Quote
I have seen want of privacy and the dream to have your own house+yard propell people towards suburbia than urban environments. I am all up for living in denser areas but what can the city do to get a family out from their single family home on 210/Intl. Golf Parkway with better schools and country-side-simulated-living to a denser urban housing? Yes, one day the suburbia will be short on land and gas prices will make it harder for people to commute that far, but by then the environmental and infrastructural damage will have been done. We need to act now to promote denser urban districts.

I think the city would do well aggressively promoting its physical and natural assets, along with its history.  Its not going to appeal to every one, but neither will living in the burbs. Nevertheless, we'll be a better community if we can have both a vibrant core and suburbs.

uptowngirl

August 13, 2008, 11:01:07 AM
So, why spend more money and build taller buildings and closer knit areas when every family can have their own front and back yard. I have seen want of privacy and the dream to have your own house+yard propell people towards suburbia than urban environments.

I think it is incorrect belief that to live in the urban core you can not have a single family house or a yard. I live in the urban core and I have a big single family house with a large front and back yard. I have plenty of privacy too, with beautiful gardens in front and back. In fact most people are shocked when they come for a visit, you can see the skyline of downtown AND hear birds, crickets, and frogs while sitting in my back or front yard.

rjp2008

August 13, 2008, 12:16:17 PM
You guys pick some funny learning-from's. ;)

(I'm from New Jersey orig btw)

Something more down the shore (a term we use for the area of Jersey closest to the beaches) would be much more comparable to Jax's near term future.


apvbguy

August 16, 2008, 12:01:13 PM

The idea of using Hoboken as a template for JAX's resurgence is well meaning but misguided.
Hoboken is a great success story, a bit over 10 years ago it was a decaying port/industrial town, the port moved 30 years ago and the major employers left in the ensuing years despite that the town has made a complete turn around. Unfortunately for the urban JAX promoters none of the dynamics present in Hoboken are present in JAX, the largest thing in the mix is Hoboken's proximity to the largest city with the largest economy in the US.
Young professionals priced out of Manhattan have moved to Hoboken in droves, this sparked the real estate redevelopment boom and consequent boom of businesses that cater to the new residents. I am not a JAX basher but trying to compare JAX to Hoboken is like comparing apples and oranges.
As many have noted the ample open space present in JAX allows the spreading out to the suburbs and most people will choose to have "elbow" room versus living in a densely packed urban core. Also the demographics of Hoboken is very different than what is found in JAX, the majority of the new residents of Hoboken are in their 20's or early 30's, single and make a good living while JAX's population is older more family orientated and makes a lower income. Hobokens cost of living is out of reach of most of JAX's young professionals, rents for the new/renovated apts are well over 2k a month for a small 2 bdrm apt.
The public transport in Hoboken is not geared to getting around locally, it is geared towards getting to NYC, and while the availability of public transport is ample it is just an accident of location.
Downtown JAX needs to get to a critical mass of employment, amenities and population before it can rebound but it is a chicken/egg situation that I nor few others have an answer for, As long as nicer outlying places continue to attract residents and business it will be a tough nut for JAX to crack

Lunican

August 16, 2008, 12:21:50 PM
Welcome apvbguy. These 'Learning from' articles are simply meant to show what is going on in places outside of Jacksonville. The cities featured are not necessarily similar to Jacksonville. Some are, but most are not.

thelakelander

August 16, 2008, 12:43:47 PM
I am not a JAX basher but trying to compare JAX to Hoboken is like comparing apples and oranges.

Lunican's post hit the nail on the head for the purpose of the "Learning From Series".  Perhaps we should change the titles for future cities that we'll be showcasing over the next few weeks.

Nevertheless, while the history of these communities may be different, when it comes to urbanism, the individual elements are nearly always the same.  For example, whether its Hoboken, Savannah or Indianapolis, all vibrant urban districts have:

A. Sidewalks
B. Pedestrian Friendly wayfaring signage
C. Streets that accommodate bike riders
D. Highly illuminated streets at night
E. Buildings that front the sidewalks, instead of parking lots
F. Public spaces that are well integrated into their surroundings
G. A high mix of uses within a compact setting
H. Infill development that favors walkability over automobiles

These are the things that we can and should strive to improve locally regardless of City A vs. City B's history, economic setting or landscape.  When viewing the images of other metropolitan regions, these are the things we should focus on.  Here, we'll find both good and bad examples that we can either follow in a similar fashion or avoid.




View forum thread
Welcome Guest. You must be logged in to comment on this story.

What are the benefits of having a MetroJacksonville.com account?
  • Share your opinion by posting comments on stories that interest you.
  • Stay up to date on all of the latest issues affecting your neighborhood.
  • Create a network of friends working towards a better Jacksonville.
Register now
Already have an account? Login now to comment.