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Historic Five Points: Jacksonville's Bohemian District

In modern usage, a bohemian can describe any person who lives an unconventional artistic life, where self-expression is the highest value ? that art (acting, poetry, writing, singing, dancing, painting etc) is a serious and main focus of their life. The term was applied particularly to the poets and writers of Carmel-By-The-Sea and the Bloomsbury Group in the first half of the 20th century, and, early in the 21st century, to a style of female fashion ( boho-chic ). Today Metro Jacksonville showcases Historic Five Points.

Published November 5, 2006 in Neighborhoods      12 Comments    Open printer friendly version of this article Print Article




1A. FUEL COFFEEHOUSE - Opened in 1999, Fuelremainsthe largest local coffeehouse in the city.

1B. PARK ARCADE BUILDING - This building is made up of seven storefronts, with a central arcade dominated by three arches.

1C. FIVE POINTS - Looking north at historic retail district along Park Street

1D. The Five Points District will well known for its funky business establishments that also incorporate a mix of interesting facade colors and unique signage.

1E. FIVE POINTS THEATER - This theater is reported to have been the home for the 1972 run of "The Godfather" that had the longest run of any theater in the country. Housing popular Club 5 in recent years, new ownership has converted the structure into a building with street level retail with offices above.

2. This mural is located Lomax Street

2A. LOMAX STREET - The block of Lomax, between Park and Oak Streets is also loading with restaurants and local retail outlets.

3. 2 SISTERS CAFE - 2 Sisters is a small mom & pop operation that serves pretty good food. The Sake House Japanese Grill and Sushi Bar recently opened next door.

4. DONA MARIA RESTAURANT - This restaurant adds to the excitement and flavor of the district by including a large outdoor dining patio and bar.



5. MOSSFIRE GRILL - The Moss Fire Grill is a popular eatery in the Five Points District. The name comes from the moss fire that started the Great Fire of 1901. Featuring a open roof deck, the restaurant was recently named one of Jacksonville's top 25 by Jacksonville Magazine.

6. THE CHELSEA LOFTS - This infill condo project recently broke ground on the corner of Goodwin and Herschel Streets.

7. AL'S PIZZA - This popular local pizza chain is located on the corner of Oak and Margaret Streets, in a recently constructed specialty retail building lining Oak Street.



8. 1661 RIVERSIDE - Five Points is in the process of gentrification. The largest example of this is a project called 1661 Riverside. When complete, the complex will house street level retail shops and 90 condo units above.

9. Riverside Square is home to a 30,000 sf Publix grocery market.



10. RIVERSIDE SQUARE - This shopping center is the first modern retail center in the city to incorporate and urban design layout, as opposed to the typical suburban ones we've grown used to. Shops lining the street in a pedestrian friendly manor, as opposed to a large surface parking lot. Today the center is 100% leased.

11. PARK LANE APARTMENTS - This 16 story condo tower was the first highrise constructed in town, outside of downtown. Completed in 1926, its also the first tall building in town to incorporate "setback" construction, creating open terraces and sun parlors.




12. MEMORIAL PARK - At the urging of Mrs. Arthur Cummer, the Olmstead Brothers, sons of noted landscape architect Frederick Law Olmstead, were commissioned to design this park in the early 1920s. The park is dominated by this large central space, shown here.

13. WINGED VICTORY - This statue is the focal point of Memorial Park. Created by Florida sculptor C. Adrian Pillars, the bronze sculpture caused a bit of controversy among local residents with the "winged figure of youth" rising victoriously above the "mad maelstrom of earthly passions.



14. The riverfront is dominated by a pedestrian promenade. The promenade is a popular place for locals to fish. If the day comes when the Northbank riverwalk is extended to Five Points, it will terminate at this location.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THIS DISTRICT: www.5pointsjax.com

OTHER INNER CITY JACKSONVILLE NEIGHBORHOOD TOURS BY METRO JACKSONVILLE:

Brooklyn: http://www.metrojacksonville.com/content/view/209/5/

Durkeeville: http://www.metrojacksonville.com/content/view/193/5/

Jacksonville Beach: http://www.metrojacksonville.com/content/view/216/57/

LaVilla: www.metrojacksonville.com/content/view/164/5/

Springfield: http://www.metrojacksonville.com/content/view/235/57/








12 Comments

JJ

November 06, 2006, 09:48:05 AM
If somebody from out of town saw this tour would think Jacksonville was a nice, progressive town?

Jason

November 06, 2006, 10:12:15 AM
I know I would.


Great tour, I learned a few things myself.

stephendare

November 06, 2006, 10:43:49 AM
Five Points was a wonderful experience.

It was totally about creating a home for the bohemians in Jacksonville.  At the time we really didnt have one place where it was comfortable to be a little offbeat or artistic.  San Marco was pretty great but still more the domain of the Laura Ashley ladies of River Road than anything else.

The Grafitti Project was terribly controversial when I did it.  Marta Fitzgerald, the Times Union reporter who married Rush Limbaugh wrote her last story about it before she left off to get hitched to Captain Oxycontin.

The pictures are amazing.  Ive got quite a few from the transition time as well.

Jason

November 08, 2006, 08:30:13 AM
Please share them in the forums Stephen!

plantationpride

September 16, 2008, 10:11:04 PM
I grew up on Amelia Island but traveled back and forth to Jax for church and school.  There's absolutely nothing on the internet on any of the gay bars during the late 70s and early 80s.  I was hoping to reminisce about some of those early years of dance clubs and early morning breakfasts at the Derby House in Five Points.

At the time, the OP Club (Old Plantation) was THE dance place, with the "confetti cannon" showering the dance floor to the tunes of "Last Dance", "Celeberation", and "Gloria".  I discovered this place just inches after the "disco" was ushered out and changed to "dance", with a new pop/rock sound featuring synthesizers ("Bette Davis Eyes", "Don't You Want Me (Baby)" and "Don't Talk To Strangers").  Here's testing my memory; there was a drag bar in Downtown but I can't remember the name.  It freaked me out at first, but once I passed through the downstairs bar, and moved upstairs to the cabaret, I found the lip-synchers quite entertaining.  There was one particular performer, on the heavy side, who sang "And I'm Telling You I'm Not Going", doing a great job, but rather exaggerating moments of seizures until one of her Nerf footballs popped out!  She brought the house down!

Then there was the Halloween contest of 1982 at "Brothers" on May Street, a small neighborhood bar where I learned to play pool.  I thought for sure I would win a prize, but my space warrior costume (sewn completely by hand, no machine) didn't even register against the fellow who won dressed as Faye Dunaway/dressed as Joan Crawford in :Mommie Dearest". 

Once, I passed by a Levi's and Leather bar called the "Phoenix"  near Hendricks and Phoenix, but I didn't dare go in.  With "The Preppy Handbook" currently the best-seller, I was a preppy at the time, so common sense sent me a message I wouldn't get sent any free drinks there!  There was the one time I went to a bar near King and Park that had the word "Junction" in it.  Very small and neighborly.

After graduating from HS, I soon leanred where the good areas were.  I had a great apartment on Riverside Avenue, but no car.  I walked once all the way to the Roosevelt Mall to see the geese on my way in to the music shop.  I liked eating at Wendy's on Park and Margaret Streets.  By day I used to shop at "Edge City Clothing", buy a book at "Cokesbury Methodist Bookstore" which I think was on Park Street at Goodwin (but I could be wrong), feed the ducks at Riversdie Park, and go to the movies at the Five Points Theatre.  I wandered over to Lee & Williams Antiques on the corner of Riverside and Osceola, owned by Dr. Ed Williams and Jerry Lee.  To my shock and surprise, Jerry Lee had been my Sunday School teacher at Victory Baptist Church on Lem Turner Road some 10 years earlier, and now, here he was, with this, this... man!  Two of the most charming, caring people.  By December 1982, I was on a plane to Los Angeles, but I never realized how fortunate I was to have a great apartment in such a great neighborhood.  I would love to have feedback confirming if these places actually exisited, or over time, actually turned out to be a dream... a pleasant dream.






jacksonvilleconfidential

September 17, 2008, 10:41:57 AM
Awesome post.

RiversideGator

September 17, 2008, 03:02:01 PM
Five Points was a wonderful experience.

It was totally about creating a home for the bohemians in Jacksonville.  At the time we really didnt have one place where it was comfortable to be a little offbeat or artistic.  San Marco was pretty great but still more the domain of the Laura Ashley ladies of River Road than anything else.

The Grafitti Project was terribly controversial when I did it.  Marta Fitzgerald, the Times Union reporter who married Rush Limbaugh wrote her last story about it before she left off to get hitched to Captain Oxycontin.

The pictures are amazing.  Ive got quite a few from the transition time as well.

Ahh the graffiti project.  Sounds productive.  Whatever happened to this?

BTW, is this a reference to the bad street art painted on the building on the east side of Lomax Street?

stephendare

September 17, 2008, 03:16:36 PM
Five Points was a wonderful experience.

It was totally about creating a home for the bohemians in Jacksonville.  At the time we really didnt have one place where it was comfortable to be a little offbeat or artistic.  San Marco was pretty great but still more the domain of the Laura Ashley ladies of River Road than anything else.

The Grafitti Project was terribly controversial when I did it.  Marta Fitzgerald, the Times Union reporter who married Rush Limbaugh wrote her last story about it before she left off to get hitched to Captain Oxycontin.

The pictures are amazing.  Ive got quite a few from the transition time as well.

Ahh the graffiti project.  Sounds productive.  Whatever happened to this?

BTW, is this a reference to the bad street art painted on the building on the east side of Lomax Street?

No, I actually despise that mural (its not 'street art', btw) intrinsically

The Graffiti Wall of Fame was actually behind the buildings where the parking is.

It was a landmark both locally and nationally for a good decade.

However when they yuppification began in earnest, the wall was boarded off and parts of it painted over.

I don't know how much of it still exists.

RiversideGator

September 17, 2008, 04:26:12 PM
I think that mural would qualify as street art using the hated wikipedia's definition:

Quote
Street art is any art developed in public spaces — that is, "in the streets" — though the term usually refers to art of an illicit nature, as opposed to government sponsored initiatives. The term can include traditional graffiti artwork, stencil graffiti, sticker art, wheatpasting and street poster art, video projection, art intervention, guerrilla art, flash mobbing and street installations. Typically, the term Street Art or the more specific Post-Graffiti is used to distinguish contemporary public-space artwork from territorial graffiti, vandalism, and corporate art.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Street_art

stephendare

September 17, 2008, 05:03:49 PM
lol.   No wonder you took up Law, rather than art.

RiversideGator

September 17, 2008, 11:26:15 PM
Either way, based on that definition the mural is "street art".

rjp2008

September 18, 2008, 09:46:28 AM
Riverside Square, Publix and 1661 area is nice.

But the Five Points intersection area - though artsy - comes across as old and dirty to me.
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